Author Topic: PWR-56 Installation  (Read 2361 times)

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PWR-56 Installation
« on: October 09, 2015, 03:48:27 PM »
Originally posted by William Brillinger on the RailPro Users Yahoo! Group on Jul 28, 2015

Looking at the PWR-56 manual today...
http://ringengineering.com/RailPro/Documents/PWR-56UsersManual.pdf

...I noticed that it says the module is supposed to be mounted "flat"...

"The only acceptable mounting orientations are: 1) Mounted to the bottom surface
of the layout with the RailPro logo facing the ground or 2) Set on top to the layout with
the RailPro logo facing the roof. Also there should be at least 2 inches of space on
each side for air circulation."

... Why do you suppose that is?

Since it has been almost a year since I looked at the manual, I mounted my PWR-56 vertically on the wall behind my layout.
I have not noticed any issues with it this way so far.

hmmm.

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Re: PWR-56 Installation
« Reply #1 on: October 09, 2015, 03:48:40 PM »
Originally posted by LK&O on the RailPro Users Yahoo! Group on Jul 28, 2015

Evenness of heat dissipation maybe?

The instructions that came with every one of my switching power supplies say to derate output by 50% if mounted vertical and not fan cooled. That's why I added fans to the ones that did not already have them.

http://www.lkorailroad.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/100_6481.jpg

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Re: PWR-56 Installation
« Reply #2 on: October 09, 2015, 03:48:50 PM »
Originally posted by Shawn Hogan on the RailPro Users Yahoo! Group on Jul 28, 2015

Interesting- I had read that in the manual also and puzzled over it. I do wonder how orientation affects heat dissipation.
Bill, maybe you haven't suffered any ill effects because you aren't loading it up with a bunch of locomotives??
BTW, what's the black screened object on the right in the photo?
Shawn

eiegeaah.jpg.png
« Last Edit: October 09, 2015, 03:51:46 PM by Archive »

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Re: PWR-56 Installation
« Reply #3 on: October 09, 2015, 03:49:01 PM »
Originally posted by William Brillinger on the RailPro Users Yahoo! Group on Jul 28, 2015

Well, I checked with Tim Ring and he says: "Required for proper heat dissipation."

The item on the right is one of my 12V LED Light power supplies, wich is loaded at about 30% right now.

I guess I'll have to make a bracket to make the PWR-56 horizontal now.
I'll put the PWR-56 on top, so heat is not trapped by the bracket for the best heat dissipation.

- Bill

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Re: PWR-56 Installation
« Reply #4 on: October 09, 2015, 03:49:11 PM »
Originally posted by Shawn Hogan on the RailPro Users Yahoo! Group on Jul 28, 2015

The other power supply is for lights?
Knowing the why behind the mounting position is good. In fact it will keep it out of sight with how I plan to build(but easily accessible)
Shawn

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Re: PWR-56 Installation
« Reply #5 on: October 09, 2015, 03:49:22 PM »
Originally posted by William Brillinger on the RailPro Users Yahoo! Group on Jul 28, 2015

Yes, These lights:
http://model-railroad-hobbyist.com/node/21591?page=7#comment-202135


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Re: PWR-56 Installation
« Reply #6 on: December 03, 2015, 10:01:35 AM »
We use those LED power supplies a lot in the Trade Show industry. They are overload protected and not very expensive at all. They are very well regulated at 12 or 24v depending on the model. I am using mine to supply my LED street and building lights. Considering running a separate 12v buss, just like my track power feeders so I can run all my LED building lights from one source. Could also use this power supply to indicate switch positions if I add another set of points to my manual switch controls.
 We also use a lot of those power supplies like the PWR-45 pictured and many are installed in a non-ventilated part of a wall or sign with no heat issues as long as they are not overloaded. As long as you keep some air around them without grouping a bunch of supplies together, I doubt heat will ever be an issue.
Modeling modern BNSF on 20x20 freelanced double deck layout under construction.