Author Topic: Using an LM-1 to control a switch.  (Read 247 times)

Dean

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Using an LM-1 to control a switch.
« on: February 16, 2019, 12:04:43 AM »
I have very few powered switches. But one that I do have is in an out of the way place. I am using an NCE Snap-It to control the switch with DCC. (it's dual coil type) The Snap-It has provisions for a momentary contact pushbutton to operate the switch. Sooo... I connected the pushbutton terminals to a cheap glass relay with a 12V coil normally open contacts. To interface the glass relay with my HC-2, I used an LM-1 that I wasn't using. I connected the headlight output of the LM-1 to the coil of the relay and the LM-1 power leads to the track rails. After the HC-2 found the LM-1, I went into the setup page for the push buttons. I changed the headlight switch function from on-off to momentary contact. I made sure the brightness control was all the way up and renamed the LM-1 to 'Switch 36'. (36 is the DCC address). The only thing odd about this setup is the switch LM-1 shows up in the locomotive pages.  But it works. Pressing the headlight button on switch 36 LM-1 operates the relay which fires the Snap-it which throws the switch.
Dean

TwinStar

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Re: Using an LM-1 to control a switch.
« Reply #1 on: February 17, 2019, 10:08:28 PM »
Dean, I previously used the NCE Switch-It in several Free-mo modules over the last decade and I think it is similar in design to the Snap-It. We wound up removing and throwing away ever single on that was ever installed. The programming on the Switch-It involves installing jumpers across contacts and then applying and removing power. Each power cycle with a certain jumper position would program the Switch-It to behave in a certain way in either a two switch or a single switch with a toggle type of action. What we found is that every time a loco would short the track, either via derailment or running a switch, the ensuing power cycling of the layout would reprogram the Switch-It back to the default position and we wouldn't be able to operate the turnout with our single switch toggle setup. We would have to power down the layout, install the jumpers, power the layout back up, power down the layout, remove the jumper, power the layout back up, and then repeat as soon as someone else ran a switch.

I don't know the configuration of your Snap-It's but if they're similar to the Switch-It then it's something to be aware of.
Jacob Damron
Modeling late 1950's Dallas Union Terminal in Free-mo modules

Texas Railway Modeling and Historical Society
trmhs.org

Dean

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Re: Using an LM-1 to control a switch.
« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2019, 06:05:25 PM »
Thanks, Jacob.
The Snap-it has been on my layout so long that I would have to get the instructions out to see how to program it. I seem to remember programming it with the throttle.

Dean
Dean

TwinStar

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Re: Using an LM-1 to control a switch.
« Reply #3 on: February 19, 2019, 08:03:54 AM »
If it programs with a throttle then it's probably a lot more robust than the Switch-It.
Jacob Damron
Modeling late 1950's Dallas Union Terminal in Free-mo modules

Texas Railway Modeling and Historical Society
trmhs.org